Holy Cow in Poteau, Okla.!

Wednesday, August 20 at 10:15 AM
Category: Arvest Community News

Have you seen the newest bull in town? Pop on by the Arvest in Poteau, Okla., to take a look! Arvest’s popcorn decorated bull will be tied up inside its branch at 3002 N. Broadway before MOOving to its permanent location at the Arvest ATM at 1228 S. Broadway.

As a long-time supporter of the community, Arvest is excited to join the “Bulls for Poteau Project” steered by the Poteau Chamber of Commerce and the City of Poteau. The organizations announced the project in February 2013 to beef up the arts and history in the community.

In 2013, the groups grabbed the bulls by the horns and placed the first two bulls at the north entrance to town and at the Reynolds Center. Now, other Poteau businesses are chipping in and placing painted bulls in front of their locations.

The Black Angus bull symbolizes both art and the history of the community. Senator Robert S. Kerr made the Black Angus bull notorious in Oklahoma in 1961 when he showed off his prize bull to President John F. Kennedy during a visit to the Kerr Ranch in Poteau.

Tags: Community Support, Oklahoma
 

Cheyne Coverdale Promoted to Branch Manager in Mountain Home, Ark.

Wednesday, August 20 at 03:15 AM
Category: Arvest Community News

We're happy to have Cheyne Coverdale rise to branch manager in Mountain Home, Ark.

MOUNTAIN HOME, Ark. — Arvest Bank announced that Cheyne Coverdale has been promoted from assistant branch manager to branch manager at the Arvest Mountain Home/Wallace Knob location.

Coverdale has been with Arvest for nearly seven years in the role of assistant branch manager. 

“We are thrilled to announce Cheyne’s promotion to branch manager. He has proven himself as a capable, valuable member of the Arvest Bank team,” said Tom Dame, President of Arvest North Central Arkansas. “We know he is a dedicated associate that maintains Arvest’s community focus and provides excellent customer service. We are eager to watch him grow in this position.”

After graduating from Mountain Home High School, Coverdale attended the University of Arkansas where he received a Bachelor of Science in business administration. He also graduated from the Twin Lakes leadership program through the Mountain Home Chamber of Commerce. He serves as treasurer of the Mountain Home Lion’s Club, financier for Twin Lakes Future and as a financial partner for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of the 14th Judicial District. 

Coverdale and his wife, Lindsey, have a four-year-old son, Brooks, and are expecting a daughter this fall.

Tags: Arkansas, Associates, North Central Arkansas, Press Release
 

Brandon Scallion Hired as Commercial Lender in Mountain Home, Ark.

Tuesday, August 19 at 04:40 AM
Category: Arvest Community News

Arvest in Mountain Home, Ark., is excited to welcome Brandon Scallion as a Commercial Lender.

MOUNTAIN HOME, Ark. — Arvest Bank is pleased to announce that Brandon Scallion has been hired as a Commercial Lender in Mountain Home. Scallion will report to Layton Lee, Loan Manager at Arvest Mountain Home.

Scallion was previously a loan review officer at Bank of the Ozarks for three and a half years, where he led numerous due diligence teams to assess potential targets for acquisition. He was also a bank examiner with the Arkansas State Bank Department for over five years. 

“We are excited to announce that Brandon is now a member of our lending team,” Lee said. “With over eight years of banking experience, we know that he is more than capable of exceeding our customers’ expectations and providing them with excellent customer service. We look forward to the value he will bring to our team.”

Scallion received his Bachelor of Science in finance with an emphasis in commercial banking from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville and was a graduate of Woodlawn High School. He is also a graduate of the Graduate School of Banking at Colorado where he received a degree in community banking.

Scallion and his wife, Christin, have two children, Landon (4 years old) and Saylor, (9 months).

Tags: Arkansas, Associates, North Central Arkansas, Press Release
 

Developing and Using a Wise Borrowing Strategy

Monday, August 18 at 11:40 AM
Category: Personal Finance

The sensible use of debt should be part of any sound financial strategy. Debt enables you to enjoy things that otherwise are beyond your current reach, but it can also have an ugly side. Too much, too expensive or the wrong kinds of debt can make life miserable. 

The basics

Borrowing costs money. That is not necessarily bad. It just means that when you pay it back, you have to pay more than you borrowed. The components of a good debt strategy are quite simple: 

  • Choose when to borrow and what to borrow for carefully.
  • Find the best interest rate and terms, based on your needs and wants.
  • Live up to your repayment responsibilities.
  • Periodically review your debt. Refinancing your mortgage or an auto loan may save you money.

The importance of a good credit record
Most lenders use your credit record to determine credit limits and what rates to charge. A good credit record will make future credit approvals easier and save money with lower rates. A program enables you to get a free credit report once a year so you can know your own credit record. You can request your free report at www.annualcreditreport.com.* Otherwise you can order a report from one of the following three large credit reporting agencies:

  • Equifax (800) 997-2493
  • Experian (888) 397-3742
  • TransUnion (800) 888-4213

Common sense borrowing habits

  • Never borrow what you cannot repay.
  • Never borrow for a luxury if you cannot afford the necessities.
  • Prioritize your borrowing based on the long-term value of what you are buying.
  • Reserve some borrowing capacity for emergencies.

Getting help if needed
Take action immediately if your borrowing is getting out of control. If credit cards are the problem, stop using them or even cut them up. Contact lenders to develop a workable repayment plan. A qualified credit counselor can help. 

Consider all the terms
Comparing credit cards’ interest rates, fees and rewards can be confusing. Choose a card that reflects how you use it. If you pay the full balance monthly, the interest rate is of little concern. Focus on any annual fee and benefits such as airline miles or cash back features. If you carry over balances, the interest rate should be a top concern. 

An offer from Arvest
Enjoy 5,000 Rewards points** upon approval for an Arvest Credit Card with Arvest Rewards before Sept. 30, 2014. There is no fee for balance transfers.

Conclusion
Be an informed borrower by using common sense, knowing your credit score and considering all the terms. If you feel overwhelmed by your debt, then seek help to get your debt under control.

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

**During this promotion, we will waive the fee for Arvest Rewards for the first year. Starting 12 months after the day your Arvest Credit Card becomes active, you will pay $24.95 per year (or $2.49 per month). Enrollment in Arvest Rewards is required. The 5,000 Rewards points will be applied to your first quarterly Rewards statement. Arvest Rewards is a program where you can earn one point for every dollar you spend when using your Arvest Credit card and/or earn one point per every three dollars when using your Arvest CheckCard. This offer applies to new credit card customers only, and is subject to credit approval. For complete details, ask an Arvest associate or go to arvest.com/rewards. Offer expires September 30, 2014. Member FDIC.

Tags: Arvest Rewards, Credit Cards, Credit History, Debt, Financial Education
 

Back-to-School Wake-Up Call

Thursday, August 14 at 10:05 AM
Category: Arvest News

It's August. And for many students around the country that means one thing -- back to school time. For parents, it means managing a necessary and sometimes difficult parental responsibility — waking sleepy children for school.

Waking up a child who is not exactly a morning person can be a stressful experience for even the calmest of parents. Rest assured, however, with a little creativity and proper planning, you can get your child from bed to bus with minimal stress.

  • Early to bed. Easier to rise. One of the easiest ways to ensure your child gets up on time is to get them to bed earlier. Experts say that preschoolers need at least 13 hours of sleep a night, while kids ages 5-12 need 11 hours. Kids over age 10 require 8.5-9.5 hours a night, so be sure to adjust bedtime schedules accordingly.
  • Natural waking. Wouldn't it be great to have your child wake up naturally? Well, there are actually a few things you can do to help along the process. Ten minutes before they wake up, turn on the light in their rooms, open their curtains, and leave the door open. Another way that's sure to get a kid out of bed (particularly a teen) is to cook their favorite foods, such as bacon.
  • Waking incentives. Some call it bribery; others call it a good incentive. Either way, rewarding your children for getting up on their own is a proven and effective strategy. Consider giving your child a "wake up" bonus in their allowance for every day they wake up on their own. Or, buy them their favorite toy or game.
  • Alarm them. Children want to feel grown up and responsible. One way to give them responsibility is to provide them with their own alarm clock and have them wake themselves. One popular alarm clock is clocky rolling alarm clock,* which beeps and scoots away to make waking fun. Younger children might like fun themed alarm clocks, such as the Minnie Mouse alarm clock.* If you have a teen, turn their smartphone into an alarm clock, so that they can wake up to their favorite song.
  • Creative waking. Wake-up time is also a time to get creative. Consider waking children up to your singing (an especially attractive alternative if your singing is poor) or by dancing. Chances are your children will do anything to make you stop.

Teaching children good waking patterns is a great way to ensure their day (and yours) gets off to a great start.

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

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